All about Bery

Just a boy, an ordinary one for some, a special one in certain way for others.
I live in the Czech republic, a country not at all significant in the heart of Europe.


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Reblogged from etsy
Reblogged from obsessedwiththeroyals
Reblogged from solos1s
Reblogged from nyaa

(Source: nyaa, via hhiyorin)

Reblogged from friendlierterms
friendlierterms:

Attack on Titan and the Walnut - Symbolism
Why the walnut?
While I was driving to student teaching today, I listened to “The Great Escape” by Cinema Staff. After some thought, I wondered why the animation staff decided to show a rolling walnut for the beginning and ending of the end credits. This led me to do some research regarding walnuts their symbolic meaning.
Various websites state that many folktales and stories use the walnut to symbolize something precious hidden under a tough exterior. In this case, we can compare a walnut’s shell to the Walls that guard the cities, and the cities as the actual nut. While the nut itself may represent the importance of the walls and the cities, the task of opening walnut can represent an entirely different meaning. According to Jungian tradition opening walnuts can represent the“attempts to solve a difficult problem in which something valuable is at stake”. Woah there, that means that the struggle to open the walnut can represent the struggle to preserve humanity.
And here’s where it gets crazy. According to other websites, while it is a known struggle to open up a walnut, the individual never knows if the nut will be good or bad. If the nut is good, then it implies that the labor was well worth it. On the flip side, if the nut is rotten or bitter, this can represent failure and a person’s struggle on something worthless.
SO, because we see the walnut uncracked, we have no idea if the nut inside will be good or bad. My interpretation? Well, I like to think that the walnut represents the whether preserving humanity was worth preserving or a pointless, fruitless struggle.

friendlierterms:

Attack on Titan and the Walnut - Symbolism

Why the walnut?

While I was driving to student teaching today, I listened to “The Great Escape” by Cinema Staff. After some thought, I wondered why the animation staff decided to show a rolling walnut for the beginning and ending of the end credits. This led me to do some research regarding walnuts their symbolic meaning.

Various websites state that many folktales and stories use the walnut to symbolize something precious hidden under a tough exterior. In this case, we can compare a walnut’s shell to the Walls that guard the cities, and the cities as the actual nut. While the nut itself may represent the importance of the walls and the cities, the task of opening walnut can represent an entirely different meaning. According to Jungian tradition opening walnuts can represent the“attempts to solve a difficult problem in which something valuable is at stake”. Woah there, that means that the struggle to open the walnut can represent the struggle to preserve humanity.

And here’s where it gets crazy. According to other websites, while it is a known struggle to open up a walnut, the individual never knows if the nut will be good or bad. If the nut is good, then it implies that the labor was well worth it. On the flip side, if the nut is rotten or bitter, this can represent failure and a person’s struggle on something worthless.

SO, because we see the walnut uncracked, we have no idea if the nut inside will be good or bad. My interpretation? Well, I like to think that the walnut represents the whether preserving humanity was worth preserving or a pointless, fruitless struggle.

(via hhiyorin)

Reblogged from danfreakindavis

cornchipz:

daleksunshine:

danfreakindavis:

when you find that perfect gif but don’t know how to use it

image

You can reverse the flow of the hotdogs if you concentrate hard enough

oh my god you can

(via f1ght4yourl1fe)

Reblogged from skoolrejekt

thegeekcritique:


Magic: The Gathering


skoolrejekt
:

Nissa Revane (2010)

Chandra Nalaar (2009)

Killing Wave (2011)

by Michael Komarck for Magic: The Gathering

(via mtgthings)

Reblogged from venuvianprincess

thevenuvianprincess:

Fire is the element of power. The people of the Fire Nation have desire and will, and the energy and drive to achieve what they want.

Earth is the element of substance. The people of the Earth Kingdom are diverse and strong. They are persistent and enduring.

Air is the element of freedom. The Air Nomads detached themselves from worldly concerns, and they found peace and freedom. And they apparently had great senses of humor.

Water is the element of change. The people of the Water Tribes are capable of adapting to many things. They have a sense of community and love that holds them together through anything.

It is important to draw wisdom from different places. If you take it from only one place it become rigid and stale. Understanding others, the other elements, the other nations, will help you become whole. It is the combination of the four elements in one person that makes the Avatar so powerful. But it can make you more powerful too.

(via evolverburuu)

Reblogged from tetsus

Life’s a bitch. So if it’s easy, you’re doing it wrong. - Core Pride by UVERWORLD.

(Source: tetsus, via hhiyorin)

Reblogged from trendingly